‘Beast Of A Snake’ Breaks Record For Largest Burmese Python Captured In Florida

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – It’s official. An invasive Burmese python captured within the Everglades over the weekend has damaged the state file measuring 18.9 ft lengthy. The earlier file was 18.eight ft lengthy.

Ryan Ausburn, a contracted python hunter with the South Florida Water Management District and Kevin “Snakeaholic” Pavlidis, a contracted python hunter with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, captured the monster sized python on Friday, Oct. 2 alongside the L-28 Tieback Canal about 35 miles west of Miami.

On social media, Pavlidis wrote, “On Friday night, we pulled this BEAST of a snake out of waist-deep water in the middle of the night, deep in the Everglades. I have never seen a snake anywhere near this size and my hands were shaking as I approached her. Every python we catch can be potentially dangerous, but one this size? Lethal. One mistake, and I am for sure going to the hospital. But more importantly, this is a once in a lifetime snake. I could go out every single night for the rest of my life and never see one this big again.”

Kevin Pavlidis, Ryan Ausburn and Angela Scafuro catch a monster sized Burmese python within the Everglades on Oct. 5. (Courtesy: Kevin Pavlidis, Ryan Ausburn and Angela Scafuro)

Ausburn described the seize as an actual “BATTLE” saying “I am just incredibly grateful for this opportunity and an experience I will never forget. Realize what you have when you have it and cherish the experience in the moment. Be grateful, be respected, and be thankful.”

Ausburn mentioned he knew as quickly as he noticed the snake “she had some size but it wasn’t until we walked to the water’s edge did I realize how big.”

Kevin Pavlidis, Ryan Ausburn and Angela Scafuro catch a monster sized Burmese python within the Everglades on Oct. 5. (Courtesy: Kevin Pavlidis, Ryan Ausburn and Angela Scafuro)

Usually, snake hunters seize the pythons by the top however Ausburn needed to seize her by the rear and began pulling however “she immediately turned back and anchored herself around a tree. It took every ounce of strength to keep her from slipping away.”

Pavlidis mentioned he has caught greater than 400 snakes through the previous 2 years, however none got here shut the scale of his most up-to-date catch.

The snake was formally measured on Thursday morning by the South Florida Water Management District which oversees the state’s python hunter program.

Kevin Pavlidis, Ryan Ausburn and Angela Scafuro catch a monster sized Burmese python within the Everglades on Oct. 5. (Courtesy: Kevin Pavlidis, Ryan Ausburn and Angela Scafuro)

More than 5,000 Burmese pythons have been captured and faraway from the Florida Everglades for the reason that state began paying hunters to trace them down in 2017. The python hunter program is managed by the South Florida Water Management District and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Burmese pythons have been first found within the Everglades almost 20 years in the past.

It’s believed they turned established in Florida on account of escaped or launched pets and they’re inflicting critical hurt to the delicate Everglades ecosystem by consuming native wildlife equivalent to possum, rabbits, deer, bobcats, and different indigenous wildlife.

It is prohibited to launch nonnative species into the wild.

They’ve been profitable at reproducing within the swampy Everglades as a result of they haven’t any predators. Females can lay as much as 100 eggs.

That’s why the state began the bounty program, during which registered hunters earn a minimal wage charge for as much as 10 hours of labor a day, plus a bonus for his or her catch: $50 for every python measuring as much as 4 ft plus $25 extra for every meals measured above 4 ft. Hunters who catch a nesting feminine python earn a further $200.

Scientists estimate there are between 100,000 and 300,000 pythons within the Everglades.

To study extra in regards to the FWC’s Python Action Team and the SFWMD’s Python Elimination Program, go to MyFWC.com/Python and SFWMD.gov/Python.

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